Hathi Trust Update – It’s here!

Received the good news this morning that we now do have access to Hathi Trust!  You’ll find it linked in the e-Library in the Article Indexes & Databases page.  Once you click on the link, you do need to login (using your ISU Net-ID and password) in order to get fullest access to materials.  I say”fullest” access by way of reminder that not everything within Hathi Trust’s collections is available full-text to all users, due to copyright restrictions.  However, you will find tons of materials are now accessible to you so do login and start exploring.

Here’s some info to help get you started:  Items marked “Full view” are available for you to read, print, and download full-text.  Items marked “Limited (search-only)” allow you to search within that item and give you a frequency number of how many times your search terms were found in the book.  It will not show you the book itself to you, but does provide a helpful link to WorldCat for you to find the library nearest you that owns that item.  (Why?  Copyright.)  Note that you can easily restrict your search results to show only “Full view” items.

The Home tab allows you 3 different methods of searching HT’s vast collections of currently over 10 million total volumes.  Catalog Search lets you check for specific titles, authors, subjects, etc.  Full-text Search lets you search contents of those millions of digitized materials – wow!  Collections search is a really cool feature.  You can create your own collections of materials that interest you, whether for your own use or potentially student- or group use.  You can use the Collections search to see what other users have done and made public.  (For example, I see that a helpful user at University of Michigan has created a 19th century cookbooks collection – simply tagging relevant cookbooks and saving them as a unique collection for others to use.)

As you might imagine, you will find a wealth of primary historical materials are now at our fingertips.  There are also lots of US state and federal government documents included, making this a good source for locating full-text of these non-copyrighted materials.  One interesting item I found was the 1900 Census of Puerto Rico, taken by the US War Department just two years after the Spanish American War.

Enumerators of Ponce

Enumerators of Ponce

 

Included in the Census and its report were a number of photographs, including interesting photos of the actual folks who worked as the Census enumerators in specific cities.  Here are the enumerators from Ponce, one of the only groups that seems to have included and employed women.

 

 

Tagalog supervisors

Tagalog supervisors

 

Coincidentally, I also found the 1903 Census of the Philippine Islands, this one undertaken by the “Philippine Commission” and the US Bureau of the Census.  This one also had photos of the enumerators, including this arty montage of the Tagalog supervisors of the Census:

Virtually all subject areas and time periods are included in Hathi Trust’s materials, as are many different languages.  An Advanced Full-text Search is available, allowing you to specify where your keywords should be found (title, author, subject, publisher, series title, etc), specify year(s), language (ranging from Abkhazian to Zuni), and by original format – archive; audio (music; spoken word; cd; lp); biography; book; computer file; conference; dictionaries; electronic resource; journal; maps-atlas, mixed material; newspaper; video (dvd or vhs), visual material, and much more.  Amazing!  Search facets along the left side of your search results screen help you drill down by subject, author, language, place or date of publication, and more, giving you lots of control over your search results, as well as lots of opportunities for happy discoveries.  Enjoy exploring!

ACLS Humanities e-Book collection

New-ish to the Library is the fascinating ACLS Humanities e-Book collection, from the American Council of Learned Societies.  This impressive collection has almost 4000 full-text scholarly books across the wide gamut of the traditional humanities (history; art & architecture; film & media studies; literature & literary criticism; linguistics; music, dance, performance; philosophy; political science, religion, and even sociology, to name a few).  There is a strong focus on “historical studies” focused on “African, American, Asian, Comparative/World, Eastern European/Russian, Economic, European, Latin American, Legal, Medicine, Methods/Theory, Middle East, and Science/Technology.”   You can download an Excel spreadsheet of the specific book titles included if you want to take a look.

Okay, we know it’s huge.  Even the title is a mouthful – so much so that you’ll see even the authors refer to it as ACLS HEB, or even just HEB.  So what can you do with HEB?  Happily, the collection boasts both an easy to use browse feature (that allows you to browse by title, author, or subject) and a very robust search engine that lets you quickly find titles / subjects / authors of interest.  Within a few clicks, you have the full-text of the book right in front of you.

acls ebook1   Once you find a book of interest, you can enter the book from its ACLS title record page.  You can go to the first page of the book and page your way through, or enter specific chapters / page ranges by using the linked Table of contents.  There are book reviews for my title linked on the page, plus the full citation and full cataloging record.  You can even get a larger version of the book jacket by clicking on your book’s image.

I found the book, Buñuel and Mexico: The crisis of national cinema, by Ernesto R. Acevedo-Muñoz and published by the Univ of California Press in 2003.  So you can see what I mean, here’s a graphic of the ACLS title page for the Buñuel cinema book I found.

Once you enter the full-text of your book, you can even choose the best display – page image, text,  or pdf – for your own reading comfort or downloading / printing needs.  You can also easily adjust the size of the page if you need a larger font or need to see an illustration in greater detail.

Speaking of illustrations, the few illustrations from book contents that I have seen have not been of the greatest quality.  This is probably the only drawback I can see during my own quick review of this collection.  Let me show you what I mean.

acls heb2

Hmmmm……  in a fantastic collection like HEB, it’s disappointing to see such blurry and grainy images.  This one comes from a book called Gay L.A. by Lillian Faderman.  There are lots of illustrations in this interesting book and none of them seems to be scanned clearly, which is really too bad.  It’s just not the same high quality images you will find in the original hardback book.  I haven’t found illustrations in other HEB books yet to compare but my guess is that this may be a current weakness throughout this collection.  You’ll need to see what you think.

So, do use this collection to find a surprising breadth of full-text eBooks in the humanities.  Don’t expect to find high quality book illustration images you can use (copyright permitting) in other projects.  You will though find nice quality reproductions of book covers.  And yes, you can find these books through Quick Search too.  Overall, a big positive addition to the Library’s collections.  Give ACLS HEB a test drive and let me know what you think!

Coming soon: Hathi Trust

Update (1/24/13):  We do now have access to Hathi Trust!  You will need to login with your ISU Net-ID and password to get fullest access to materials.  Remember not everything within Hathi Trust is available to all users full-text due to copyright restrictions, but you will find plenty of materials that are fully available.  Have fun exploring!

~~~ (Original post follows below)~~~

Looks like the Lib may soon be partnering with Hathi Trust Digital Library.  If you’re not familiar with them, be sure to take a look at their site.  They currently have over 5 million digitized books contributed by partners.

Hathi Trust Digital Library

Hathi Trust Digital Library

Just a few minutes ago, I was searching for a copy of Gems of Chinese Literature.  Our local copy seems to be in the Storage building, but I also found a link to Hathi Trust, where there are a few editions online.  I found an edition that is open to the public to view / read online.  I’m going to guess you could find content in Hathi Trust relevant to all race & ethnic studies areas and much more.

While some items in Hathi Trust are available to the general public to view full-text, many items are locked up.  Partners are able to login and view much more.  As I understand it, partnership means we would also need to contribute digital content to the site.

We’ll see how things develop.  This is potential great news, and hopefully everything will be ironed out for us to have access to this fantastic collection of digital books!  Stay tuned….

Sorry for the blurry image on this one! :s

Coming Soon: American Indian Film Talk

ISU Lectures Program is co-sponsoring “American Indian Film Talk,” a discussion panel featuring filmmakers Jon Proudstar, Mary Goose, Rean Goose and Lucas Goose.  When / where:  April 25, 7:00 pm, Gallery, in the Memorial Union.

Proudstar has appeared as an actor in numerous movies (including Sterlin Harjo’s indie film Barking Water), shorts, and various TV series.

More recently, he has written and directed the award-winning short film Dude Vision (2005) and the feature-length drama So Close to Perfect (2009).

Visit IMDB for a full list of his many projects and credentials.

The Goose family are Meskwaki and Chippewa, and based in Iowa.  Mary Goose is also a published poet and writer.  Her work has appeared in a number of anthologies and journals, including the following anthologies that you can find in the Library:

   The Remembered Earth: An Anthology of contemporary Native American literature, ed. by Geary Hobson.
Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1981.
Parks Library GEN COLLECTION:  PS508 .I5 R4 1981

   Songs from this Earth on Turtle’s Back: Contemporary American Indian Poetry, ed. by Joseph Bruchac.
Greenfield Review Press, 1983.
Parks Library GEN COLLECTION:  PS591.I55 S64x 1983 

This event is co-sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program, and the Center for Distance and Online Learning.  Plan to attend and show these filmmakers your interest and support!

Upcoming lectures

April at ISU features a number of upcoming Lectures of interest.

On Tues, April 10, writer Susan Power (Standing Rock Sioux) will deliver a lecture entitled “Thinking Indian: The Urgency of Native Stories in the New Century.”  7:00 pm @ Great Hall, Memorial Union.  (See Lectures Program for more information.)

Selected Works by Susan Power available in the Library include:

  • “Miss Indian Chicago” (short story), Southern Review, June 1, 2010, pp. 345-356.  (Full-text available through Academic Search Premier and other subscription databases.)
  • “The Table Loves Pain,” American Indian Quarterly 28(1/2): 115-117.  Personal essay on creative writing, Native American literature, and inspiring college students.  (Full-text available through Academic Search Premier and other subscription databases.)
  • Roofwalker, published by Milkweed Editions, 2002.  A collection of 12 short stories organized in two parts – Stories and Histories.
    (Available:  PS3566  .O83578  R66  2002)
  • The Grass Dancerpublished by G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1994.  A collection of interwoven short stories.  This collection won the prestigious PEN Literary / Ernest Hemingway Foundation Award for first fiction in 1995.
    (Available:  PS3566  .O83578 .G73  1994)

~~~

Also on Tues, April 10, professor and author Olúfémi Táíwò will deliver a lecture entitled “Africa’s Second Struggle for Independence: What’s Modernity Got to Do with It?”  8:00 pm @ the Gallery, Memorial Union.  (See Lectures Program for more information.)

Selected Works by Olúfémi Táíwò available in the Library include:

  •   How Colonialism Preempted Modernity in Africa, published by Indiana University Press, 2010.  This scholarly work examines colonialism in Africa, legal and constitutional aspects, and globalization.
    (Available:  DT14   .T35   2010)
  •   “The Love of Freedom Brought Us Here: An Introduction to Modern African Political Philosophy,” South Atlantic Quarterly 109(2): 391-410.   (Full-text available through Academic Search Premiere and other subscription databases.)

On Thurs. April 26, Dr. Gretchen Bataille will lecture on the topic of “Women and Leadership: Career Success and Satisfaction.”  Dr. Bataille has published on Native American literature as well as ” diversity, civil rights and ethnic studies.”   7:00 pm Sun Room, Memorial Union.  (See Lectures Program for more information.)

Selected Works by Gretchen Bataille available in the Library include:

  • Faculty career paths: Multiple routes to academic success and satisfaction (with co-author Betsy E. Brown).  Published by Praeger Publishers, 2006.
    (LB2331.72  B38  2006)
  • Native American women: A biographical dictionary (with co-editor Laurie Lisa). Published by Routledge, 2001.
    (REF E98  W8  B38  2001)
  • Ethnic studies in the United States: A guide to research (with co-authors Miguel A. Carranza & Laurie Lisa).  Published by Garland Pub., 1996.
    (E184  .A1  B275  1996)

Help welcome these visitors and support campus programming by attending these Lectures!

Update: Streaming videos from Filmakers Library Online

Filmakers Library Online provides award-winning documentaries with relevance across the curriculum—race and gender studies, human rights, globalization and global studies, multiculturalism, international relations, criminal justice, the environment, bioethics, health, political science and current events, psychology, arts, literature, and more. It presents points of view and historical and current experiences from diverse cultures and traditions world-wide. This release now provides 1,001 titles, equaling approximately 791 hours.”  See:  http://flon.alexanderstreet.com/

Stay tuned…

Update (March 1, 2013):  We’ve been enjoying Filmakers Library Online for a while now.  This package provides written transcripts for its documentaries, which increases accessibility and searchability.  Videos include search features, plus you can easily create your own clips.  Lots of other flexible features are available – please take a look and start exploring this great resource!

New Year’s Resolution: Learn Quick Search!

If you’ve been at ISU for a while, you’ve probably noticed that the Library website no longer has a traditional library catalog.  Instead, there’s a new search tool called Quick Search at the top of the home page.  If you’re a faculty member, student, researcher or a member of the ISU community, the New Year is a good time to level up your Quick Search skills so you can get the most out of Quick Search, and also know when it’s best to use a different search tool.

Hey, it’s just a search box.  It can’t be that complicated!  

No, it’s not complicated if you’re searching for just anything – but for library research, that’s rarely the case.

Quick Search box

The first thing you need to know is that it’s really worth your time to use one or more of the 3 drop-down menus (shown above) that are located just below the search box.  The choices listed in these drop-down menus help you focus your search.  Why spend time plowing through thousands of results if they’re not what you need?

Quick Search & Drop-down menu #1

The second thing you need to know?  Quick Search lets you search far more than would a traditional library catalog.  We’ve opened up drop-down menu #1 here, so you can see all the types of materials you can find with this tool, including Articles, content located on the Library website, images, and a lot more.  That’s why it’s a good idea to always take a few seconds to focus your search.  Just type your search terms in the box, then choose the relevant selection(s) in one or more of the drop-down menus, then click the Search button.  You’ll have your focused results in a fraction of a second.

Third thing:  In general terms, Quick Search connects to various indexes and databases and allows you to search their contents seamlessly, without ever leaving Quick Search.  Nice!!  This can be a huge time saver.

But, if you’re doing research on race & ethnic studies topics, get ready for the shocking news!

Most subject-focused indexes that focus on race and ethnic studies research articles have NOT been “connected” with   Quick Search due to software incompatibilities.  Shocked: http://www.cs4fn.org/internet/therecipeforspam.phpThis means you’re probably not searching the best or most comprehensive collections of research articles in these subject areas. Yes, you may find some interesting articles and information, but you’ll definitely need to go directly to indexes like Black Studies Center, Bibliography of Native North Americans, Ethnic NewsWatch, Hispanic American Periodicals Index, Chicano Database, and others to make sure you’re choosing the best tools for a thorough, scholarly and comprehensive search.

It’s a good strategy to use Quick Search and subject-focused indexes to ensure you’re getting everything you may need.

Do start exploring the drop-down menus and some of the many fun features of Quick Search, such as creating your own account, tagging, and reviewing materials of interest.  It’s a great way to start the New Year!